Category Archives: Dexterity Impaired

For users who have impaired dexterity which impacts their use of Apple devices. This also includes users who have trouble with handwriting, for example those with dysgraphia.

Keyguards for iPad and iPad Mini

A keyguard is a plate which sits over a keyboard or touch screen, with spaces that a user can put their fingers or a pointer through to hit the keys. Users who have trouble with fine motor control often find that keyguards help them to hit the key they’re aiming for, and users who have weakness or fatigue that makes it difficult to hold up their arm can rest their hand on the keyguard while pressing keys.

Continue readingKeyguards for iPad and iPad Mini

What Are Time-Independent iOS Games & Why Do You Want Them?

Most “standard” computer and phone-based games get harder because they get faster, relying on the player’s reflexes and coordination keeping up. For example, in Tetris the blocks appear and drop faster and faster as your level increases:

Tetris, like most single player games, devolves into twitch gameplay as the levels increase.
Tetris, like most single player games, devolves into twitch gameplay as the levels increase.

Untimed games or time-independent games are those where you aren’t penalised if you play a game very slowly, have bad reflexes, or don’t posses the hand-eye coordination to time your movements accurately. Games like this are “turn-based games” where any game actions only occur in response to the player’s actions, and additionally they are free of timers or time-related limitations. Continue readingWhat Are Time-Independent iOS Games & Why Do You Want Them?

How To Click Without Using Mouse Buttons in OS X

One of the numerous obstacles those of us with physical limitations face is how do we perform a right-click with a one-button mouse? Those that are able to use a physical keyboard can simply hold down the control key while clicking and that will emulate a right-click. But what about those of us who can’t use a physical keyboard or have trouble using one? There’s actually several solutions out there to this problem and in this brief article I thought I’d touch on a few of the simple software options.

These solutions will also help anyone else who has trouble manually clicking their mouse or trackpad. Continue readingHow To Click Without Using Mouse Buttons in OS X

Accessing the iPad: Mouthsticks, Head Pointers, and Styluses

When Apple announced the iPad the first thing I thought was “how, as a quadriplegic with limited use of my arms, will I be able to use this device?”. Fortunately I immediately already had a pretty good idea on how this could be accomplished being that I’ve been an iPod Touch user for almost 18 months. Ultimately the iPad is probably going to be able to do quite a bit more than the iPod Touch but the iPod Touch is still essentially the iPad’s “little brother”. So I thought I’d share the methods I use to access my iPod Touch in hopes that these ideas may be useful for people with physical disabilities hoping to get an iPad. Continue readingAccessing the iPad: Mouthsticks, Head Pointers, and Styluses

8 Ways To Stop Your Arms Hurting

Are you a computer user in this keyboarding age whose arms, wrists, or hands hurt from typing or mousing too much? Even if you don’t have full blown RSI or carpal tunnel, pain after using the computer too much can be disabling. Also, pain that only happens for a little while after you use the computer can be a signal that you may be in store for worse if you don’t change the way you do things. Continue reading8 Ways To Stop Your Arms Hurting